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New Access Clinic Opening in Noblesville

A couple years ago, Ashley, Alysia and I realized that many children who attend the Fishers clinic travel from Noblesville.  Not long afterwards, the Fishers clinic approached full capacity, and the three of us commenced an intensive search for a Noblesville building to create more space in Fishers and reduce commute durations for our Noblesville … more »

Access Joins the Lighthouse Family

Alysia, Ashley and I started Access in 2013 to create therapy programs that fuse the best practices of speech-language pathology and behavior analysis. We envisioned thoughtfully curated spaces that would inspire communication and laughter. We wanted every learner who walked through our doors to feel understood and supported as they worked to realize their potential. … more »

The Power of Gestures

My most used tool in my practitioner’s toolbox is one that at first glance often seems foreign to both speech-language pathologists AND Board Certified Behavior Analysts.  Many of my therapy sessions feature a variety of hand gestures that either supplement or replace my verbal speech prompts with learners.  The gestures aren’t American Sign Language or … more »

New Access Clinic Opening in Fishers

We are thrilled to announce that a new Access clinic will be opening at the beginning of May in downtown Fishers, conveniently located just a couple minutes drive west of I-69.  This new location will exclusively serve children between the ages of eighteen months and eight years.  We admittedly pondered long and hard whether to … more »

Quick Tip: Avoid Repeating a Child’s Errors

Most people would agree that it’s important to model the speech forms we want a child to produce and to expose a child to correct speech forms as much as possible.  That said, there’s a tendency when correcting a child’s speech error to repeat the error.  For example: Child: Look, mom, it’s a doddie. Parent: … more »

Finding Reinforcers

The Definition of a Reinforcer There is perhaps no term used in behavior analysis that is tossed around as casually in the general lexicon as the word “reinforcer.”  Most people familiar with applied behavior analysis (ABA) recognize that the science of ABA is based on the principle of reinforcement.  Unfortunately, the scientific definition of a … more »

The Differences Between Speech and Language

The technical term for my job title is “speech-language pathologist,” which sometimes is shortened to the acronym “SLP.”  More often though, I’m known to the public as a “speech therapist.”  In fact, when introducing myself, I’ve often found it easier to simply refer to myself as a speech therapist, as the technical term is a … more »

Sparking Speech

As a novice speech-language pathologist, I used to think there was really nothing I could do to spark speech in a non-verbal child.  I was wrong.  Research shows that alternative augmentative communication, such as sign language, promotes VOCAL language.   In addition, a procedure known as stimulus-stimulus pairing may also prompt talking. Stimulus-Stimulus Pairing Stimulus-stimulus … more »

Language Therapy: The Case Against Carrier Phrases

I’ve recently written about the importance of teaching children requests as “first words” rather than animals, letters, numbers, or colors.  I’ve also been discussing the importance of avoiding general requests and social niceties.  For example, don’t teach the word “more” and refrain from prompting children to say “please” too early.  The list of “don’ts” continues … more »

Language Therapy: The Case Against the Word “Please”

In my last blog post, I discussed the reasons why it’s best to avoid teaching the word “more” as a first word.  Now, I’d like to make a case against the word “please.”  I’ve seen some practitioners teach “please” as a first word, and when this occurs, the pitfalls are largely the same as teaching … more »