The Latest From Our Blog

New Access Clinic Opening in Noblesville

A couple years ago, Ashley, Alysia and I realized that many children who attend the Fishers clinic travel from Noblesville.  Not long afterwards, the Fishers clinic approached full capacity, and the three of us commenced an intensive search for a Noblesville building to create more space in Fishers and reduce commute durations for our Noblesville … more »

Access Joins the Lighthouse Family

Alysia, Ashley and I started Access in 2013 to create therapy programs that fuse the best practices of speech-language pathology and behavior analysis. We envisioned thoughtfully curated spaces that would inspire communication and laughter. We wanted every learner who walked through our doors to feel understood and supported as they worked to realize their potential. … more »

The Power of Gestures

My most used tool in my practitioner’s toolbox is one that at first glance often seems foreign to both speech-language pathologists AND Board Certified Behavior Analysts.  Many of my therapy sessions feature a variety of hand gestures that either supplement or replace my verbal speech prompts with learners.  The gestures aren’t American Sign Language or … more »

New Access Clinic Opening in Fishers

We are thrilled to announce that a new Access clinic will be opening at the beginning of May in downtown Fishers, conveniently located just a couple minutes drive west of I-69.  This new location will exclusively serve children between the ages of eighteen months and eight years.  We admittedly pondered long and hard whether to … more »

The Luxury of Pairing

Working in the ABA world as a speech-language pathologist, I realize I’m lucky.  I’ll go further:  I’m spoiled.  I used to rejoice when a third party payor authorized sixty half-hour sessions of speech-language therapy across a one year period.  Today, I’m accustomed to designing programs for clients that target speech and language for between twenty-five … more »

Quick Tip: Avoid Repeating a Child’s Errors

Most people would agree that it’s important to model the speech forms we want a child to produce and to expose a child to correct speech forms as much as possible.  That said, there’s a tendency when correcting a child’s speech error to repeat the error.  For example: Child: Look, mom, it’s a doddie. Parent: … more »

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